In Defense of “The Fashion Girl”

One of my favorite aspects about fashion and clothing, is that you can always find a way in which it can  relate to your life–at any moment. When I  tell people I’m fascinated about telling stories with clothing, they look at me like I have a third eye. However, I don’t blame them for asking, or wanting a further explanation of what I mean by that. One of the reasons I love learning about fashion is because there is a history behind all of it. Every era’s mainstream fashion reflects the environment in which the people were in at a given time. Political factors usually determine choices in clothing and even fabrics. A perfect example of a political factor that influenced clothing was the Feminist Movement of the ’60s. Designers like Mary Quant decided to rebel against traditional conservative clothing attire and so she designed the miniskirt. Lately, I’ve felt belittled because of the major I chose in college: Fashion Merchandising. There’s a stereotype that every fashion student dances around their room trying on clothes, just for the sake of it.

While I’ve always known the stereotypes surrounding people who work/study in the fashion industry, it is settling in now as I approach graduation. And while I don’t discredit all of the stereotypes, because I’ve met some #people…let me say that we are not all like that. I’m not. Yes, I’ve met people who can checkmark every single stereotype in the book, but I’ve also had great mentors who blow my mind away with their work. My mentors are intelligent, well-rounded, business-oriented, and go-getters who have succeeded in the industry. I wish more people who are not a part of the industry would see this. I understand that most people who aren’t in a given field, will not know everything about it (which is okay). I just don’t respect when people assume, instead of doing research on what they do not know.

Throughout my years in college, I’ve learned the importance of consumer research, marketing, and even the psychological factors that influence shopping behavior. Our job is to study what people want, and in turn offer it to them at the right place, time, and price 😉 As graduation approaches I hope more employers will not focus on the stereotype of “the fashion student” but instead in my qualifications and skills I have to offer as a person.

I know my major isn’t the only one with stereotypes. What’s your major or field of study? Do you feel it gets stereotyped by society? Let me know in the comments below.

In Defense of "The Fashion Girl"

YSL Head Scarf. Thrifted/ Necklace. Forever 21/ Bag. Kate Spade/ Top. Thrifted

Even though this high-low skirt doesn’t reflect a political factor in my life, it does have a story. I chose to wear it for this post because it reflects that in life there will always be highs and lows. During a given time we can be experiencing the biggest thrill of a lifetime, but it can quickly go downhill. Even though we can’t avoid those low moments we can strive for those highs again, and always reach them as long as we keep going.

In Defense of "The Fashion Girl"

In Defense of "The Fashion Girl"

In Defense of "The Fashion Girl"

In Defense of "The Fashion Girl"

In Defense of "The Fashion Girl"

In Defense of "The Fashion Girl"

Always,

Reyna Cazares

 

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